Dissertation:

In my dissertation, “#Hashtag, Black Girl Magic: Reimaging Black Women Fluid Artists Within the Spirituality of Womanism,” I situate Black Girl Magic within a theoretical continuum which examines Black women’s use of social activism to voice change and how this social activism influences social consciousness and popular culture. To position this continuum, I begin with Womanism (as coined by Alice Walker), move on to Black women’s Afrofuturistic art, literature and music and connect each of these directly to the incarnation of “Black Girl Magic.” I maintain that all three are not only in conversation with each other, but arguably neither of these could exist without influence from its predecessor. My project thus participates in, and contributes to, the new and emerging scholarship on Afrofuturistic artists, as an addition and continuation of historical social activism, drawing a direct connection to the modern incarnation of the hashtag activism of Black Girl Magic. This work links the spirituality within Womanism, and Black women Afrofuturistic art to examine spirituality. For this reason, I make a direct connection between the Afrofuturism of Black women and the spirituality of Black women. This art embodies Black women’s spirituality in the interceding spaces where the artists examines their history and connection to the ancestors. Like the oral traditions of Black people, Black women’s Afrofuturistic art would not exist as it does without an intrinsic connection to Womanist spirituality. Although much of these artists draw on the knowledge and history of ancestors, from hoodoo and Haitian Vodou and Louisiana voodoo to Loas and African gods and goddesses, I argue that Afrofuturistic art by Black women is a spiritual endeavor for which Black Girl Magic exemplifies.

Scholarly Publications

“Hero Me Not.” Rutgers University Press (expected publication 2022)

Black Lives Cinema

“Black Women and the New Magical Negro.” African American Cinema Through Black Lives Consciousness. Reid, Mark. Wayne State Univ Press, 2019. Print.

“In Service to the White Creator: The Black Maid Archetype in Ann Petry’s The Street and Kathyrn Stockett’s The Help.” (Under review).

“Mary Turner.” African American National Biography. Gates, Ed. Henry Gates and Evelyn B. Higginbotham. Oxford: Oxford Univ., 2008. Print.

“Moses Carl Holman.” African American National Biography. Ed. Henry Gates and Evelyn B. Higginbotham. Oxford: Oxford Univ., 2008. Print.

“Rosina Tucker.” African American National Biography. Ed. Henry Gates and Evelyn B. Higginbotham. Oxford: Oxford Univ., 2008. Print.

“Harry E. Davis.” African American National Biography. Ed. Henry Gates and Evelyn B. Higginbotham. Oxford: Oxford Univ., 2008. Print.

“Slater King.” African American National Biography. Ed. Henry Gates and Evelyn B. Higginbotham. Oxford: Oxford Univ., 2008. Print.

“Margaret Bush Wilson.” African American National Biography. Ed. Henry Gates and Evelyn B. Higginbotham. Oxford: Oxford Univ., 2008. Print